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Top 10 Most Dangerous Human Killing Sharks: Ocean's Most Agressive Predators


Sharks are amongst the most aggressive ocean predators.  Numerous people have been attacked by different species of sharks, but a few people actually know that in the majority of attacks humans are mistakenly for pry. The list of the following most dangerous sharks and the number of shark attacks have been gathered according to the International Shark Attack File from the Florida Museum of Natural History.

Most Dangerous Sharks

The data on human fatality caused by Sharks attacks are recoded for the known cases of attack between year 1580 to 2008. In cases where fatalities are equal for two types of sharks, ranking are concluded based one the total fatal and none-fatal shark attacks.

10- Dusky Shark

Known unprovoked attacks on 3 humans, killing 1 person.

Most Dangerous Sharks - Dusky Shark

Most Dangerous Sharks - Dusky Shark

The dusky shark is a species of of Requiem shark, which is usually found in tropical and warm temperature ocean waters around the world. Dusky shark can swim to depth of 400 m (1,300 ft). This family of shark migrates seasonally towards the poles in the summer and back to the equator in the winter. Known to travel hundreds to thousands of kilometers, this shark is has been responsible for attacked on people.

9- Oceanic White-tip Shark

Known unprovoked attacks on 5 humans, killing 1 person.

Most Dangerous Sharks

Most Dangerous Sharks - Oceanic White-tip

Oceanic White-Tips are slow moving sharks but definitely belong to the most dangerous list of sharks. This shark is known for attacking survivors of ship or airplane crashes in right in the middle of oceans. People who splash in waters trying to swim to safety catch the attention of this shark very easily. This shark has the ability to detect the smallest of the movements as well as scents from miles away. With its large fins it can pretty much glide right through the empty ocean waters while excreting the least of energy, looking for injured prays.

8- Short fin Shark

Known unprovoked attacks on 8 humans, killing 1 person.

Most Dangerous Sharks - Short Fin Shark

Most Dangerous Sharks - Short Fin Shark

The short fin shark is known for its sharp and pointy nose. Short fin sharks fall under the category of large mackerel sharks. Along with their closely related cousins – long fin sharks; mako (Isurus paucus), short fins are listed as some of the most dangerous shark species that are also commonly referred to as a “mako shark”.

7- Black tip Shark

Known unprovoked attacks on 28 humans, killing 1 person.

Most Dangerous Sharks - Black Tip Shark

Most Dangerous Sharks - Black Tip Shark

As the name suggests, the Black tip sharks have noticeable black dorsal fin spots and commonly to exist in the coastal tropical and subtropical waters around the world. Black-tip sharks usually grow to length of 1.5 m (4.9 ft) and can easily take a human leg or an arm in a bite.

6- Sand Tiger Shark

Known unprovoked attacks 32 humans, killing 3 people.

Most Dangerous Sharks - Sand Tiger Shark

Most Dangerous Sharks - Sand Tiger Shark

As the sixth species on the list of most dangerous sharks, sand sharks are found worldwide in tropical waters on both sides of the Atlantic oceans. Sand sharks are the only known species of shark to surface for gulps of air, which are they able to store in their stomach. The air taken from the surface will allow these sharks to float motionless in the water as they hunt.

most dangerous sharks

5- Blue Shark

Known unprovoked attacks on 13 humans, killing 4 people.

Most Dangerous Sharks - Blue Shark

Most Dangerous Sharks - Blue Shark

The blue sharks live in deep waters in the world’s tropical oceans. While they prefer cooler waters, blue sharks are known to migrate thousands of kilometers. They mostly haunt and eat on smaller fish and squid, but they have been seen hunting and taking much bigger prays like humans. As the fifth most human killing shark, blue sharks also go by the nickname of the “wolves of the sea”.

4- Requiem Shark

Known unprovoked attacks on 39 humans, killing 7 people.

Most Dangerous Sharks - Requiem Shark

Most Dangerous Sharks - Requiem Shark

Requiem sharks (in all of its species) swim in the warm seas and oceans of the world. Requiem sharks have round eyes and give birth to youngs that are born fully developed.  This dangerous shark varies widely in size, ranging from lengths of as little as 69 centimeters (2.26 ft) adult up to a massive length of 7.5 meters (25 ft) adult length, which is as long as a fully grown great white. As the fourth most dangerous shark to humans, requiem sharks have been recorded on a large number of attacks on humans.

3- Bull Shark

Known unprovoked attacks on 82 humans, killing 25 people.

Most Dangerous Sharks - Bull Shark

Most Dangerous Sharks - Bull Shark

The bull sharks are also known as Zambezi sharks, which are very common in the warm waters of  all around the world. What makes this shark so different and dangerous to people is that it can swim up shallow, rivers and pond and has the ability to take on fresh waters as well as salt waters. Swimming along the coasts and up the rivers, the bull shark is well known for its unpredictable, often aggressive behavior and attacks on humans. Various other polls have listed bull sharks as having the most number of attacks on humans than any other sharks.

2- Tiger Shark

Known unprovoked attacks on 88 humans, killing 27 people.

Most Dangerous Sharks - Tiger Shark

Most Dangerous Sharks - Tiger Shark

 

As the ninth most dangerous shark to humans, tiger sharks can rip through the ocean waters at blistering speeds also amongst the top 10 fastest swimmers. Tiger sharks can reach lengths of over 5 meters (16 ft). These massive and dangerous sharks have extremely powerful jaws and are found in many tropical oceans.

Most Dangerous Sharks

Most Dangerous Sharks

1- The Great White Shark: Top 10 Most Dangerous Sharks

Known unprovoked attacks on 237 humans, killing 65 people.

Most Dangerous Sharks - Great White Shark

Most Dangerous Sharks - Great White Shark

Number one of on top of the most human killing sharks is of course the great white. When talking about the great whites most people can quickly remember the best selling novel and movie Jaws. The great white is also know as the white death. This shark is the largest and the most dangerous specie of shark, growing to lengths of 6 meters (20 ft) in length and as much as 2,268 kilograms (5,000 lb) in weight. The great white shark usually feeds on ocean mammals like seals and larger fish like the tuna and can easily mistake a human for its prey. For this very reason swimmers and surfers usually fall at the risk of being attacked.

To conclude our list let us remember that sharks are not by nature brutal and aggressive towards humans, while it is actually the human specie that is killing millions of sharks on yearly basis. Sharks play a very vital role in the ecosystem of our world and their demise could affect the lives of every human being on earth.

If you have enjoyed our list of aggressive sharks, please do not forget to share with our friends on Facebook, Twitter or by email.

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  • Kirk Cushing

    Sharks (all species listed above) have accounted for 131 human deaths since 1580 to 2008 respectively. That is 131 recorded human deaths divided by 428 years of recording – adding up to an average of 0.3 deaths in 365 days (1 year). Dividing this number further would include how much time people spend in the ocean, how many people are in the ocean and how many sharks their are to be estimated within ‘striking distance.’

    Even taking into account the number of ‘known unprovoked’ shark attacks since 1580 (over five generations; less than 100 years after europeans ‘discovered’ north america; 428 years ago..) that would still place your odds of dying from a shark attack at approximately 24% (131 / 535 x 100 = 24% ). These numbers do not match with the man eater — “most aggressive” fame of Sharks.

    It is estimated that 100 million (100,000,000) sharks are killed by humans annually, due to commercial and recreational fishing. The vast majority of these sharks… aren’t even listened above. Most sharks haven’t changed in over 450 million years (as far back as fossils go) and they have survived 5 mass excitations. And now it is estimated that over 90 percent of all sharks in our oceans are gone. Are sharks really that aggressive, unpredictable, dangerous and killing machines as the media proclaims? The International Shark Attack File from the Florida Museum of Natural History does not seem to have enough data to support any of those claims based on stats. Scientists and marine biologists claim the very opposite of the nature and behaviour of sharks.

    Maybe its time to rethink our views on these so-called killers of the deep. Our society is based on science and facts, so let’s look at the facts shall we? Suggestion for Top10Stop.com — Top 10-Misunderstood Guardians of the Oceans: Sharks

    • Admin

      Hi Kirk,

      I totally understand and agree with every single point you made. Maybe we should have worded the title less on the aggressive side.

      Sharks are huge part of our eco system and the balance of our oceans’ food chain and survival. They are far more of contributors to human existence and survival on earth than a few attacks, all of which have happened by mistaking human for their prey and of course because we have intruded their living space.

      Although I have to also add that the reduction in sharks population is not primarily due to its “monsterization” but more so its haunting for food and supposed medical benefits and medicine in western Asia.

      The title given to the article was not to make sharks look as a group of merciless human predators but to say exactly what they naturally are; “oceans most aggressive predators”, although, again I admit that it is more of an exaggeration.

      • Tuti

        Kill all sharks must be the best measure. If a problem appears well resolve it. take a bath quite is a right.

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  • matt

    some sharks are preaty dangerous

  • noah

    Hi Everybody,

    I agree with Kirk as well, but his math is all wrong.
    The probability of being attacked (not killed) by a shark in the U.S. in 2010 was about 0.0000003%.
    This is a conservative estimate. It is probably less in many other countries and a bit more in places like Australia.

    By the way everybody, you are 12 times more likely to die by drowning at the beach than by shark attack.

    Read on to understand why and how I calculated this.

    An accurate way to calculate the probability of being attacked by a shark would be done by taking the total number of occurrences of individuals entering the ocean (swim, surf, kayak, etc) for a given period of time and then dividing by the total number of shark attacks for that same period of time.

    For example:
    The International Shark Attack File (ISAF) statistics show that in 2010 there were 4 shark attacks in California, 30 in the U.S., and 79 reported shark attacks worldwide. Of those 79, 6 were fatal. The ISAF also states that during that same period, over 100 million people visited U.S. beaches. I think it is a fair to presume that 10% of those individuals entered the water at the beaches they visited. This would mean that approximately 10 million individuals entered the ocean in 2010 (this is not accounting for those who entered the water outside a documented beach). Based on these numbers, the probability, which is a measure of likelihood, of being attacked by a shark in the U.S. in 2010 was about 0.0000003%. For comparison purposes, in the year 2000, there were 74 drowning at U.S. beaches. If we accept all these numbers as accurate, it is a striking realization that someone is 12 times more likely to die by drowning at the beach than by shark attack.

    • Admin

      Great observation Noah,

      Shark attacks are definitely hyped up by a lot people and your calculations show exactly why they are not nearly as dangerous as generally perceived.

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  • ML

    Your photos and some of your info and stats are inaccurate. For one thing, the shark you label “a requiem shark” is a sand tiger (aka gray nurse, aka ragged tooth). Also, a “requiem shark” refers not to a single species but a family of of several species. Most of the sharks you list here are requiem sharks; the sand tiger is NOT a requiem shark. Also, I’ve never seen short fin makos simply “short fin shark” anywhere else. It seems like this info has been copy pasted from various sources of uneven quality.

    Some of the attack stats you list seem at odds with those kept by the Florida Museum of Natural History’s “International Shark Attack File”, which is the best known source of reputable data on shark attacks.

    Regarding some of the comments here, I see a lot of them seem to be parroting the ‘conservationist chic’ party line about how the dangers of sharks are exaggerated. Now, I love sharks and am very concerned about their declining numbers around the world. As an avid diver I am quite aware of this issue and have witnessed their disturbing reduction in numbers over the past few decades, which seems to be accelerating. For example, blue sharks, once a common sight off the coast of southern California, are now almost never seen; a real tragedy.

    However, the problem is excessive and unregulated commercial fishing (especially long line fishing), both in the U.S. And abroad (especially Asia), not, say, Shark Week documentaries or Jaws movies. The idea that if only people thought of sharks as misunderstood milquetoasts of the deep rather than mindless killers their numbers would rebound is shallow, misguided, incorrect, and useless so far as conservation efforts are concerned. What is needed is a firmer commitment to regulate commercial fishing both here and abroad, monitoring shark populations, and research into better understanding other factors that may be contributing to their demise.

    I don’t quite understand all the self-righteous grandstanding over Shark Week documentaries. Sure, it is for the, most part low brow infotainment crap, but I don’t believe I’ve ever seen one of that doesn’t point out the that sharks generally pose very little risk to humans. Some of these ‘conservationist chic’ (i.e. pseudo conservationists) types complaining about the sharks’ PR problem remind me of a self-righteous puritanical preacher crying “Sinners repent!” There’s a lot of self-righteous grandstanding by people who don’t what they’re talking about.

    Look, SOME Sharks DO pose a danger to humans. A Great White, for example, is an opportunistic apex predator; a large, floundering animal in the water (i.e. a human) is a good candidate for a meal, not “a case of mistaken identity”. At the same time, the fact is, the vast majority of most seals and sea lions, who live out their lives in Great White feeding territory and who are their preferred prey WILL NOT be attavked

  • ML

    Your photos and some of your info and stats are inaccurate. For one thing, the shark you label “a requiem shark” is a sand tiger (aka gray nurse, aka ragged tooth). Also, a “requiem shark” refers not to a single species but a family of of several species. Most of the sharks you list here are requiem sharks; the sand tiger is NOT a requiem shark. Also, I’ve never seen short fin makos simply “short fin shark” anywhere else. It seems like this info has been copy pasted from various sources of uneven quality.

    Some of the attack stats you list seem at odds with those kept by the Florida Museum of Natural History’s “International Shark Attack File”, which is the best known source of reputable data on shark attacks.

    Regarding some of the comments here, I see a lot of them seem to be parroting the ‘conservationist chic’ party line about how the dangers of sharks are exaggerated. Now, I love sharks and am very concerned about their declining numbers around the world. As an avid diver I am quite aware of this issue and have witnessed their disturbing reduction in numbers over the past few decades, which seems to be accelerating. For example, blue sharks, once a common sight off the coast of southern California, are now almost never seen; a real tragedy.

    However, the problem is excessive and unregulated commercial fishing (especially long line fishing), both in the U.S. And abroad (especially Asia), not, say, Shark Week documentaries or Jaws movies. The idea that if only people thought of sharks as misunderstood milquetoasts of the deep rather than mindless killers their numbers would rebound is shallow, misguided, incorrect, and useless so far as conservation efforts are concerned. What is needed is a firmer commitment to regulate commercial fishing both here and abroad, monitoring shark populations, and research into better understanding other factors that may be contributing to their demise.

    I don’t quite understand all the self-righteous grandstanding over Shark Week documentaries. Sure, it is for the, most part low brow infotainment crap, but I don’t believe I’ve ever seen one of that doesn’t point out the that sharks generally pose very little risk to humans. Some of these ‘conservationist chic’ (i.e. pseudo conservationists) types complaining about the sharks’ PR problem remind me of a self-righteous puritanical preacher crying “Sinners repent!” There’s a lot of self-righteous grandstanding by people who don’t what they’re talking about.

    Look, SOME Sharks DO pose a danger to humans. A Great White, for example, is an opportunistic apex predator; a large, floundering animal in the water (i.e. a human) is a good candidate for a meal, not “a case of mistaken identity”. At the same time, the fact is, the vast majority of most seals and sea lions, who live out their lives in Great White feeding territory and who are their preferred prey WILL NOT be attacked, so SURE, the odds of a human who bathes in the shallows near shore a few hours for a few days a few weeks of the year has almost NO chance of being attacked.

    What’s needed in these discussions is to stay fact focused and not to distort the facts either by exaggerating the dangers posed by sharks or by denying the dangers they do pose.

    [This concludes this unsolicited rant about mislabeled photos(sorry to nit pick there old boy, but I just HAD to) and grand standing 'conservationist chic', "sharks only bite people mistake!" foolishness. We now return you to your normally scheduled browsing.]

  • ML

    A couple of comments regarding Kirk’s post…

    While it’s true that sharks first appeared at least 420 million years ago (the age of the oldest shark fossils), it is NOT true that “most sharks haven’t changed in 450 million years”. Modern shark families appeared in the Jurassic, roughly 150 to 200 million years ago. There may be some extant primitive shark species similar to the sharks of 450 million years ago but I’m not aware of any off hand.

    Now, while I agree that the odds of being attacked by a shark for the typical beach bather are quite small, there is no way to precisely compute the numerical odds here because the available data is too ambiguous. We can know with certainty, given the population distribution and typical behavior and ranges of both typical bathers and sharks, that it is highly unlikely, but there is now way to put a firm number on it. Your calculation however makes no sense statistically (dividing the number of attacks by the number of years shark attacks are recorded over would NOT constitute your odds of being attacked). I have no idea why the number 535 is in your calculation (you may want to take a course in statistics).

    Also, the fact that a person’s odds of being attacked by a shark are very small doesn’t mean some sharks aren’t aggressive predators quite capable of killing and eating a human. As I’ve pointed out elsewhere, the vat majority of seals and sea lions in southern California (the Great White’s preferred natural prey item, living in Great White hunting grounds) will NOT be attacked by sharks; does this mean that the idea that Great Whites pose a threat to sea lions is an exaggeration or to call Great Whites “aggressive sea lion eaters” would be inaccurate? Of course not.

    I’ve been in the water with most of the species listed above, so I could hardly be considered a person with an exaggerated sense of the dangers posed by sharks. The bottom line is this; for typical bather in the ocean, or even for a diver in deep water, you have for all practical purposes no reason to fear sharks. Things change however when you actually SEE a potentially dangerous shark in the water (a bull, tiger,
    white); it would wise to LEAVE the water. MWhy? Precisely because these species ARE potentially dangerous apex predators. The main reason the odds of a human being attacked are so low is because, first of all, your odds of even seeing a shark in the first place is extremely low. I assure you, were you to find yourself within striking distance of a Great White, you would not doubt the potential danger posed by the species or comforted by the idea that if it attacked it would only be because it thought you were a seal or sea lion.

  • Tman

    Your numbers seem a bit off…the Oceanic White Tip has killed sixty plus individuals unprovoked, that number is taken simply from the death count of the Indianapolis attributed to sharks.

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  • Matty

    who writes this ??? The construction and grammar is absolutely awful. It’s like a four year old wrote it.

    • Nadiafdzy2

      Who cares about grammer its the name and picture of the shark that matters you bloody fool

  • Matty

    And the photo you have as a “Bull” shark… isn’t a Bull shark. A Bull shark looks similar to a Great White, but with a broader head and is a very dark colour.

    • Nadiafdzy2

      Dont be an idiot and stop complaining you write one if your so perfect go on.

  • Bob@hotmail.com

    you guys make no sense AT ALL ive been on five different sites about sharks and clearly the most dangerous is bull shark and your stealing pics of sharks and giving names when your really not actually sure what shark is what i can write a better and more realistic report about sharks and im 8 get your facts right because your playing with the minds of people telling them great white is the most dangerous whats your proof whats SO scary about great whites heres my proof a bull shark is most dangerous because it tends to be very grouchy it has most attacks on humans and it can adapt to fresh water who are you calling it third most dangerous you should be disapointed puting these fake facts on the internet :[

  • Ilsejoy8

    i am stuck on sharks i cant get my nose out of them what i’m focusing on what shark bit bethany hamilton i think it was a great white but now that i’m doing more reasearch i’m thinking it might be a tiger shark
    oh ya by the way a great white is most danger and NOT the bull shark the great white is top shark

    • Nadiafdzy

      Who cares about the stupid grammer its the name and picture of the shark that matters you bloody fool.

    • Yodalover09

      no bull shark is by far great whites are just dangerous because of there size

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  • Hobocos

    i know it is politically incorect to have poor sphelling or to condone the killing of sharks. but since they are at the top of the food chain, humans can easily take their place. really is the world going to be overrun with seals and tuna becouse we wont eat enough. they arn’t like wolves and mice for crying out loud. what is the worst thing that happens if we overfish shark. they are magnificent so was trex so what. quit your crying nancy and kill a shark

  • Matthew

    you are right ilsejoy8 a tiger shark attacked Bethany Hamilton not a great white shark you are right about something else to a great white shark is the most dangerous shark you will ever see in the ocean. You are very smart

    • fish girl

      great whites are maybe the most dangerous in the OCEAN. but bulls can swim up freshwater rivers. The first documented attacks in New jersey were a result of the Bull shark in freshwater rivers.

  • Sharkcheetah

    My Friend, He will not give up on sharks. He loves them, he has posters,books,bookmarks, and alot of other stuff. He is in love with the Great White the most. He keeps on going in oceans where Great Whites mostly live. I keep telling him that he bite get killed by one but he doesn’t listen. So i’m helping him study for the Sharks. he pays me twenty bucks a hour. I’m kinda greedy but i get used to it.

  • Sharkcheetah

    I need to find more websites now. Stupid limited websites.

  • Sharkcheetah

    Help. Anyone know a website about Great White Sharks or any sharks…ugh XD

    • sharkgurl

      SHARK TRUST, OR ANY RESEARCH SITES ARE THE BEST ONES. ANY SITE WITH (.ORG) IS PROBABLY GOING TO BE THE MOST FACTUAL.

  • Sharkcheetah

    Wait? Where do Tiger Sharks live?

  • marc

    great white is actually at #3 because a tiger shark will literally eat anything you put near it.

  • fasj;dfghds

    and a great white is not the most dangerous shark in the ocean, people may think that because theres more of them than tiger and bull sharks. bull sharks are right behind the tiger sharks. tiger sharks eat boots, metal, anything. their the dumb aggressive ones, not the great white. it scopes out its prey more than others. a great white will attack you because it will mistake you for a seal or sea lion etc. then it will let go once it figures out your not what it wanted and also you have bones. great whites dont usually eat things with big bones in it like humans and it goes for flubber and fatty foods like seals. tiger shark is the most aggressive shark there is nobody can even argue about that.

    • http://www.facebook.com/KassandraCalves Leona Kate Yahana

      No,Great White sharks sometimes attack humans again if they like the taste of you’re flesh.

      • ThsiufdgABSKFC jhgfkjhgkl

        Your*

      • Brock Stanton

        You are stupid that is not the case

  • Marbio

    Sharks get a bad reputation, but considering the number of people that enter the ocean every year the number of shark attacks is very small. They are almost always cases of mistaken identity, which is why such a small percentage of incidents result in fatalities; the shark often realizes its mistake and retreats.
    And this list is full of errors, the biggest of which is that there is no such species as the Requiem Shark. The Requiem Shark is a family of sharks (Carcharhinidae) containing around 50 species.

    Yes, sharks are very efficient predators, but they aren’t the evil man-eaters they are often portrayed to be. They are in much more danger from us than we ever were from them.

  • LoveSharks

    Love how they say unprovoked. How are they unprovoked? Once you step in that water your in their territory, your giving them the right to do whatever they please to do with you. You should be knowing at any chance you could get bitten or killed.

  • Pappu

    very beautiful fishes

  • http://www.facebook.com/roger.fancher.9 Roger Fancher

    The ironic thing about sharks-especially the great white-is they have the greatest maneating potential of any predator ever known to prey on a human, yet it does the least follow through in exploiting that potential. It has the gut capacity to eat 4 or 5 humans in a single rampage, yet even the humans it kills(never more than 1 per attack) are only partially nibbled on, or even live long enough to die in a hospital. The only instance I’ve heard of a victim of a 20 footer “disappearing” is Robert Pamperin, who was supposedly diving for abalone when attacked. There are at least rumors of a hoax, & pamperin turning up alive @ a bar. There doesn’t seem to be much evidence of serial maneaters. Most maneaters who do that are predominantly mammals. ps: penmenship, & spelling issues could be due to faded keys, like the pc I’m using

  • Zeb

    He said most dangerous, not most aggressive. Of course Tiger sharks are the most aggressive, follow by the bull sharks. But, great whites are still the MOST dangerous, due mostly to their immense size. Tiger sharks are, as someone else posted, “the dumb aggressive ones,” and pose a greater risk of attack if they’re near, but the Great White is still the most dangerous.

  • Rodney Fox

    No way Bullshark deadliest….

  • doris

    that’s so cool

  • http://www.facebook.com/wendy.andrade.92102 Wendy Andrade

    my name is wendy andrade, and it is amazing to about these sharks and to know the dangers of them too. I do have the fear of sharks, but i hope that one day i can see them up close and personal. I should say that im sorry to the people in the past that have been attack by these wonderful looking species. I just also wish that we as humans didnt hunt them and hurt them either. they should be protected and be living a very long time. They are our pre historic creatures…

  • http://www.facebook.com/wendy.andrade.92102 Wendy Andrade

    its amazing to know and learn and read about these sharks.

  • Cl

    Actually I have been studying sharks for 5 years and for a fact the great white is the and will always be the most dangerous shark in the world.

  • http://www.facebook.com/alyssa.gadsby.50 Alyssa Gadsby

    wow great whites are dangerous

  • MadScientist

    This list is rubbish! To start with Requiem sharks are a family of sharks that include most of those already on the list. Oceanic whitetips killed hundred, if not thousands during WWII. And WTF is “excreting energy”…

  • keneth allen barroga

    kaya ni chavit makipaglaban sa mga pating nato, sisiw kay chavit yan

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